Welcome to my online art gallery. I'm Laura Hunt. I invite you to browse, and to contact me with any questions. Enjoy your visit!



Artist's Bio

Laura Hunt is a full-time fine artist based in Fort Worth, Texas. Her childhood on a central Texas farm, while idyllic in many ways, lacked any hint of art education. Once a larger world of art books, galleries, and museums, opened up to her, she soaked up whatever knowledge she could. Her English degree served her well in her career in marketing and graphic design, but on her own time, in spurts, she nurtured herself as an artist, working in textiles, pastel portraits and figures, cut paper illustration, greeting card design and watercolor. A major life change in 2013 gave Laura the impetus to bid the marketing career goodbye—with gratitude, and commit to a full-time studio practice.

Since the beginning of 2019, Laura has focused on contemporary figurative painting, which melds a love of abstraction and a fascination with humankind. After several years of creating non-objective abstract work, she responded to the insistent tug at the sleeve to create a new body of work, one that would have at its core the human figure and the universal stories it could tell. But she didn’t leave abstraction completely behind. It still appears in the ambiguous but vaguely familiar backgrounds that provide her archetypal figures a home.

Acrylic paint is the artist’s foundational medium, to which she may add patterned paper, marks and scribbles, a scrap of vintage map or corrugated cardboard. For smaller work, she prefers paper, switching to canvas or wood panels for larger pieces. Recently corrugated cardboard has become an often-used surface. She works from several sources, including live sketching, vintage photographs, and her own photographic library. Always experimenting, she welcomes any new material that raises the work’s tactile impact or emotional presence.

Laura’s artistic inspirations include the folk and tribal art of Africa and the Americas, the Abstract Expressionists, and the figurative work of David Park and David Bates.